imply / implication

• One statement IMPLIES another if it indicates that the other statement is true without actually saying so “explicitly”, or in so many words.

• For example, the statement:

When Dick saw the snake he screamed.

implies that the statement

Dick was afraid of the snake.

is true although it does not say so explicitly.

• The noun form of the verb IMPLY is IMPLICATION. For example we can say either:

Dick did not actually say he was going to quit his job, but that was what he implied.

or

Dick did not actually say he was going to quit his job, but that was the implication of what he said.

• These words are often used in sentences like:

When Harry asked Sarah if she wanted to get her hair done before the party, she angrily replied, "Just what are you implying?"

• The idea of implication is often useful in the study of verb tenses. In explaining the use of the present perfect for example a teacher might say:

When we use the present perfect in a sentence like “Jane has been married to Dick for seven years,” we are implying that they are still married.