flesl.net society & politics: Glossary: kettling 1 (meaning and history)

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GLOSSARY :: Kettling: the meaning of the word and some history


tactic:
method of winning or getting advantage in war, game, business, etc

street protester:
to protest means to say that some action, decision, policy, etc. is wrong (unfair, unjust, harmful etc); street protesters are people who go into the streets to publicly protest the actions and policies of their government

riot gear:
a riot is violent behavior by a large group of people usually in a city and usually leading to property damage and injuries; it often involves fighting with police or soldiers who are trying to end the riot. Gear is clothing or equipment used for some special activity.

cordon:
a line of police, soldiers, security guards, etc. preventing people from entering or leaving an area. A verb, cordon off, is also commonly used for the practice of putting a rope, or yellow tape, around an area to keep people out or in.

advance:
move forward

formation:
a special arrangement of soldiers, war planes, etc. that is maintained as they move. E.g. The planes flew by in formation.

bang:
make a loud noise by hitting something

shield:
flat object made of wood or metal that fits on a soldier’s arm for protection in battle

grunt:
make a pig-like sound

intimidate:
frighten

forcibly:
by force, i.e. violently.

baton:
a small “club” (long, thin object for hitting people) used by police

retaliate:
respond aggressively to an attack. E.g. if someone hits you and you hit them back, you’re retaliating

roughly:
violently, i.e. the police officers who do this aren’t worrying about whether or not they’re going to hurt the person

suspect:
if you suspect someone, you think they have done something wrong

commit a crime:
do something “criminal” (A crime is something that is against the law, i.e. illegal; “criminal” is the adjective form and also the noun form (a person who commits a crime is a “criminal.”)

train:
“train” means to teach someone how to do something (rather than how to understand it)

military look:
“military” is the adjective for things connected with war, armies, etc. “Look” here is a noun meaning “appearance”

fits in well with:
goes with, suits, is appropriate to