flesl.net paired stories: drama (David Noble)

web address: flesl.net/Reading/Stories/Series2/David_N/Extras/DavidN_drama.pdf

violate:
fail to respect; go against

compatible:
if two things are compatible they “go” with each other, can “exist” together etc.

concerned with:
interested in; worried about

profit:
in business, “extra” money that remains after all expenses have bee paid

consequences:
results, effects

survive:
continue to exist

the shift:
the move (away from)

faculty:
university teaching staff

critical:
not in agreement with (adjective form of the verb “criticize”

traditional:
adjective form of “tradition”—an old (“old-fashioned”) way of doing things (refers here to the old (face-to-face) way of teaching

mediate:
be between (“intervene between”)two things or two people

materials:
texts, exercises etc used in teaching

• drama activities for “David Noble”

drama 1: Shortly after learning that he is not going to be hired by Simon Fraser University, David Noble is interviewed by a reporter on the subject of the purpose of universities.

some of the following questions might be asked:

- You have said that the administrators of Simon Fraser University have violated the real purpose of all universities. What is the real purpose of a university?

- Can’t a university search for truth at the same time as it tries to make a profit? (Aren’t these two purposes compatible with each other?)

- Why have universities recently become more concerned with sales and profit than they were in the past? (Is it connected with the fact that universities are receiving less money from governments than they were in the past? Don’t universities need to make money in order to survive?)

- What do you think the long-term consequences will be of the shift away from a concern with truth and understanding?

- What do you think the faculty at Simon Fraser think about their university’s concern with making money? What about the students?

drama 2: Shortly after learning that he is not going to be hired by Simon Fraser University, David Noble is interviewed by a reporter on the subject of online education.

some of the following questions might be asked:

- You have said you believe that one reason you were not hired by Simon Fraser University is that you have been critical of their “Virtual U“ program and, generally speaking of the whole idea of online education. Could you explain your position on these things please?

- Why do you think face-to-fact contact is so important?

- Online courses can offer more personal (one-on-one) contact between students and teachers (and also between students) than traditional courses often can. Doesn’t this make up for the fact that all the contact is mediated by a computer screen?

- Isn’t it better to take a good online course with a good teacher and good materials than a poor traditional (face-to-face) course with a poor teacher and poor materials.

- Aren’t online courses much less expensive than traditional ones? Doesn’t this mean that if we have more online education that we’ll have a better educated society?